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Woman dies from brain-eating amoeba after using neti pot

08 December 2018

Doctor Charles Cobbs said his patient, a woman in her 60s, filtered her neti pot water.

The woman's brain infection went undiagnosed for so long because the type of amoeba she had was so uncommon and also moves very slowly, the Times stated.

An amoeba is a single-cell organism that can cause fatal disease in humans, and they live in warm soil and water.

"There have been 34 reported infections in the U.S.in the 10 years from 2008 to 2017, despite millions of recreational water exposures each year", according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

"We didn't have any clue what was going on", he added.

"This is extremely rare". They hope her case will let other doctors know to consider an amoeba infection if a patient gets a sore or rash on the nose after rinsing their sinuses.

A woman who was told by her doctor to rinse her sinuses twice daily to clear up a chronic sinus infection died from a brain-eating amoeba. A CT scan showed an abnormal lesion in her brain that indicated she might have a tumor, so doctors sent a sample of tissue for testing.

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But how did the amoebas get in her brain in the first place?

According to the doctors who treated the woman, the non-sterile water that she used it thought to have contained Balamuthia mandrillaris, an amoeba that over the course of weeks to months can cause a very rare and nearly always fatal infection in the brain.

As reported by the Seattle Times, a woman was admitted to a local hospital's emergency department after suffering a seizure in January. That said, the woman's case was rare; there were only three similar cases in the USA from 2008 to 2017, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Within a week, she was in a coma, and her family made a decision to take her off life support.

She used the device over the span of a year.

"She had not been boiling water, using sterile water or using sterile saline". "I think she was using (tap) water that had been through a water filter and had been doing that for about a year previously". "So that's what we suspect is the source of the infection", Cobbs said, according to KIRO.

Dr Cobbs continued: 'It's extremely important to use sterile saline or sterile water.

In 2011, Louisiana health officials warned residents not to use nonsterilized tap water in neti pots after the deaths of two people who were exposed to Naegleria fowleri while flushing their nasal passages.

Woman dies from brain-eating amoeba after using neti pot