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Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend - here’s how to watch

09 August 2018

Your meteor rates will be lower, but it's possible to see at least a few of the brightest meteors over the course of a few hours.

This year the meteor shower will peak on the night of August 12, going into August 13.

The Perseid meteor shower is perhaps the most beloved meteor shower of the year for the Northern Hemisphere.

The Perseids appear to emanate from between the constellations Perseus and Cassiopeia, but to catch them there's really no need to worry about which direction you're looking. The best views will come before dawn on the 13th, Astronomymagazine predicts. That's when the peak will start to build as Earth drifts through the most dense part of a cloud of cosmic debris left behind by Comet Swift-Tuttle, which passes by our planet and the sun once every 133 years.

As meteors enter the earth's atmosphere they leave streaks of light in the sky, which some people call shooting stars.

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Active Junky, which is also the sister site of Space.com, has provided a list of the nation's top cities, and the best places they can go to watch the meteor show.

The Perseid meteor shower has been taking place since mid-July, but will hit its peak this coming weekend.

The shower is expected to peak on the night of Sunday August 12, though Saturday and Monday will also offer excellent views.

Perseid meteors tend to be brighter than others so the shower is ideal for anyone wishing to see their first "shooting star". NASA recommends about 45 minutes for your eyes to adjust to the darkness. "The moon will be near new moon, it will be a crescent, which means it will set before the Perseid show gets underway after midnight", NASA's Bill Cooke told Space.com. Meteors can appear anywhere in the sky so try and find an open area, away from street lights.

Perseid meteor shower peaks this weekend - here’s how to watch