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Canada has every right to be insulted over United States tariffs

13 June 2018

Listen above to hear what kind of impact these retaliatory tariffs might have on the USA, why George says the tariffs will "hurt both sides", and how the worldwide bridge between MI and Canada fits into the countries' trad relationship.

The White House is quietly trying to fix the American government's fractured relationship with Canada as President Donald Trump is in Singapore to meet with North Korean leader Kim Jong-un, Politico reported Monday.

Trudeau, in Quebec City for bilateral meetings with non-G-7 leaders after the summit, did not comment as he arrived.

The two-day 44th G7 summit ended on Saturday.

"On his comments, I'm going to stay focused on defending jobs for Canadians and supporting Canadian interests", Trudeau said before walking away from reporters. "Look, countries can not continue to take advantage of us on trade".

What did Trudeau and Trump say?

And on Twitter, the hashtag #ThanksCanada was trending with Americans thanking their neighbours to the north for everything from Nanaimo bars to hockey to caring for airline passengers during 9/11.

At a news conference Tuesday after his summit with North Korean leader Kim Jong Un, Trump recounted his recent tough exchanges with Trudeau.

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But a bipartisan group on Capitol Hill was upset from the moment that the president first got involved. Republican and Democratic lawmakers introduced the amendment last week.

While other presidents and prime ministers have had testy relations - president Richard Nixon famously used a profane word, behind closed doors, to refer to Trudeau's father Pierre Trudeau, also in the context of trade talks - neither side has demonstrated this level of animosity since John Diefenbaker feuded with John F. Kennedy in the early 1960s.

He said Trudeau's promise to follow through with tariffs on USA goods - a response to Trump's own tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico, and the European Union - would hurt the Canadian economy.

The British government has been eager to sign a trade deal with the US after the United Kingdom leaves the European Union next year.

The U.S. -Canada spat escalated when at a news conference, Trudeau said Canada would take retaliatory measures next month in response to Trump's decision to slap tariffs on steel and aluminum imports from Canada, Mexico and the European Union. Some of Trump's aides also lashed out at the Canadian prime minister.

"Sometimes when we think about tariffs, when we think about a trade war, we lose sight of the real impact, and that's on workers", Singh told a news conference on Parliament Hill.

"The picture with Angela Merkel, who I get along with very well, where I'm sitting there like this" - Trump said, crossing his arms - "that picture, I'm waiting for the document because I wanted to see the final document". "Not fair to the PEOPLE of America!" he tweeted.

Liberal MP and former dairy farmer Wayne Easter said there was a real sense of panic building in his P.E.I. riding over the implications of Trump's pronouncements following his departure from the G7 gathering.

"Business confidence, and subsequently capital spending, is at risk if this tension continues through the summer", said Tai Hui, J.P. Morgan Asset Management chief market strategist for Asia Pacific. Kudlow said Trump won't let people "take pot shots at him" and that Trudeau "should've known better".

Canada has every right to be insulted over United States tariffs