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West Hartford's Lhakpa Sherpa Breaks Record by Successfully Reaching Mount Everest Summit

17 May 2018

On Wednesday, May 16, at 5:40 a.m., according to Outside Magazine, Sherpa reached the summit of the world's tallest peak for the ninth time, breaking her own record for the number of successful climbs by a woman.

Kami Rita Sherpa, 48, successfully scaled Sagarmatha, as the 8,848-metre Everest in known in Nepal, for the 22nd time and set a record for most ascents of the peak by a male climber.

Kami Rita first climbed Everest as a 24-year-old in 1994.

Meanwhile, Lhakpa Sherpa also reached the summit Wednesday, marking her ninth trip up the mountain.

He and his team started climbing last night from South Col (Nepal Side) and reached the summit at around 8:30 am today, according to Pemba Sherpa of Seven Summit Treks, which organised the record expedition.

Over 500 people, including Nepali Sherpa guides who do not need permits, are hoping to climb the mountain this month.

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Apart from Kami, dozens climbed the mountain Wednesday, Shrestha said from the Base Camp. Briton Kenton Cool climbed the mountain for the 13th time, becoming the British national with the most ascents of the world's highest peak.

The United States-based climber has repeatedly broken her own record for the most Everest summits by a woman.

She moved to America 16 years ago and says she plans to continue climbing, while keeping her job in the supermarket.

Sherpa was also given a Town of West Hartford pin, which she planned to attach to the West Hartford Libraries banner that she displayed on the top of the world's tallest mountain when she reached the summit previous year.

Army personnel from Garhwal Rifles and NIMAS personnel also demonstrated ice climbing, speed climbing, abseiling and different forms of rock climbing. Some 26 climbers had to descend to fix their oxygen regulators.

On the Tibetan side, a team was forced to retreat from just below the summit when at least 11 of their bottled oxygen systems failed. Air at the top of Everest contains less than a third of the oxygen at sea level.

West Hartford's Lhakpa Sherpa Breaks Record by Successfully Reaching Mount Everest Summit