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White House defends Trump over lawsuit on violation of anti-corruption rules

25 June 2017

The suit, which was filed in U.S. District Court in Maryland, is the third such lawsuit against Trump, arguing that the president is violating key parts of the Constitution created to ensure that the country's leader is not beholden to foreign interests.

The attorneys general of Washington D.C. and Maryland are launching a first-of-its-kind legal challenge to a president of the United States, claiming Donald Trump has violated anti-corruption laws by continuing to take payments from foreign governments since taking the oath of office.

The most recent of these lawsuits however have a better chance than the others as the allegations are the first to be said to violate the constitution emolument clause.

Trump announced in January that he would hand his business over to his sons Donald Trump Jr. and Eric Trump and to Alan Weisselberg - a longtime Trump business executive - through a financial trust, in an effort to eliminate potential conflicts of interests.

The attorneys general are also seeking the release of copies of Trump's personal tax returns to determine his involvement in foreign business dealings.

Trump himself has called the earlier lawsuit about the emoluments issue "without merit, totally without merit".

After the CREW lawsuit was filed, the Trump Organization said that Trump, a New York-based real estate mogul and investor, had relinquished all involvement in his businesses.

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Democrats would be wise to think twice before driving her out prematurely, and give in so easily to a tide of sexist hatred. They just don't know how to make it happen. "We should stop talking about Trump all the time, and Russian Federation ".

"The emoluments clauses are a firewall against corruption", said Frosh. Citizens for Responsibility and Ethics in Washington, a watchdog group, has an emoluments lawsuit pending against Trump in Manhattan, and the group's lawyers are serving as unpaid outside counsel in the case brought by Frosh and Racine.

NORTHAM: The lawsuit also contends Trump's businesses are drawing away customers from hotels, convention centers and the like in Maryland and D.C. White House Spokesman Sean Spicer batted away the lawsuit by two Democratic attorneys general as partisan politics.

Maryland and D.C. are presented with an "intolerable dilemma" when Trump asks them to grant his businesses land-use permissions or favors, the attorneys general allege.

The White House didn't immediately respond to requests for comment Monday.

Attorneys General Racine and Frosh expressed their thanks to their staffs and to several partners who provided assistance in assembling the lawsuit.

"It's unprecedented that the American people must question day after day whether decisions are made or actions are taken to benefit the United States or to benefit President Trump", Frosh said. The Constitution typically explicitly names the president and vice president when parts of the Constitution refer to them, with clauses generally referring to government officials not always applying.

Trump increases business from foreign diplomats and others doing business at his family's hotels and the restaurants, the suit alleges. "Each President, regardless of temperament or ideology, has sought, in his own way, to honor that solemn vow [to defend the Constitution]", the lawsuit read. He replied that Trump's business interests "do not violate the Emoluments Clause", for reasons spelled out by the Justice Department's filing on Friday.